German

Articles translated from the German

Third Sermon on the Passion

by Johannes Brenz
translated by Timothy Rosenow

In this set of three sermons from 1564, Johannes Brenz expounds upon a harmony of the passion history. Each of the translations was completed by different individuals who are all at various locations and stages of their training for the full-time Gospel ministry. The first sermon was translated by Aaron Voss, currently a senior at Martin Luther College, the second by Jacob Haag, currently studying in Leipzig, Germany at the seminary of our sister-synod, the Evangelisch-Lutherische FreiKirche (ELFK), and the third by Tim Rosenow, a first-year student at Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary in Mequon. Skills cultivated in the confessional languages prove valuable to pastoral students at every point of their education and remain a blessing into their ministry. May these words of Brenz be as valuable to their readers this Lenten season as they have been to their translators.

Gold Nugget No. 6: Synodical Sermon

by C.F.W. Walther
translated by Aaron Jensen

Walther preached this sermon at the opening service of the convention of the Central and Eastern Districts of the Missouri Synod in 1867. In it he reminds us what the spirit of the Church really is.

Winter Hymn

by Joachim Neander
translated by Aaron Jensen

Joachim Neander (1650-1680) was a Reformed teacher and hymnist. He enjoyed wandering through the countryside near Duesseldorf, where he served as principal. Eventually in his honor this area was named Neanderthal, which means “Neander Valley,” and so indirectly he lent his name to the fossil found there in 1856. The most popular of his hymns is “Praise to the Lord, the Almighty” (CW234). This winter hymn, set to the melody “Gott Sei Dank Durch All Welt” (CW226), is also still sung today by the Amish to the tune of “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.”

Philippians Hymn

by Johannes Olearius
translated by Aaron Jensen

This hymn, based upon Philippians 2:5-11, is set to the melody “O Gott, Du Frommer Gott” (CW 459).

Chapter 24: All’s Well That Ends Well

by Carl Manthey-Zorn
translated by Aaron Jensen

This is one of three translations of the final three chapters from Carl Manthey-Zorn's memoirs of his time as a missionary in India entitled, "This and That from the Life of a Missionary to East India." For more information on Zorn, please see his biography, also published in this issue.

Chapter 23: Preaching to the Heathens in Kudumiamalei

by Carl Manthey-Zorn
translated by Aaron Jensen

This is one of three translations of the final three chapters from Carl Manthey-Zorn's memoirs of his time as a missionary in India entitled, "This and That from the Life of a Missionary to East India." For more information on Zorn, please see his biography, also published in this issue.

Chapter 22: Four Days of Preaching to the Heathens in the Land of Pudukottai

by Carl Manthey-Zorn
translated by Aaron Jensen

The following three pieces are the final three chapters from Carl Manthey-Zorn's memoirs of his time as a missionary in India entitled, "This and That from the Life of a Missionary to East India." For more information on Zorn, please see his biography, also published in this issue.

Gold Nugget No. 5: Mission Festival Sermon

by C.F.W. Walther
translated by Aaron Jensen

Walther preached this sermon at a mission festival held in Sheboygan, WI in June, 1864. In it he shows us the significance of the second petition of the Lord’s Prayer.

Gold Nugget No. 2: Sermon on the 4th Sunday after Epiphany

by C.F.W. Walther
translated by Aaron Jensen

This sermon was written for the fourth Sunday after Epiphany, 1855. It is published here with a disclaimer. Walther interprets Jesus’ getting to a boat and sailing as signifying the Church of Christ travelling to a new place. We cannot approve of such allegorical hermeneutics. When Matthew said that Jesus got into a boat, he meant that Jesus got into a boat. Walther draws things from these passages which they do not contain. Nevertheless they are the pious thoughts of a faithful and gifted theologian and because they offer valuable insight into the history of the continually migrating Church they are a beneficial read. Of special interest may be some of his comments towards the end of the sermon, warning would happen even to his beloved St. Louis if they would not preserve the Gospel faithfully.

Your Mediator Comes

by Johann Jacob Rambach
translated by Aaron Jensen

Johann Jacob Rambach (1693-1735) was a professor of theology at both Halle and Giessen. Although he was to some degree caught up in both the pietist and rationalist movements, he did leave the Lutheran church many wonderful hymns, including "Baptized into Your Name Most Holy" (CW294) and "My Maker, Be with Me" (CW598). This joyful Christmas hymn is sung to the melody "Wie Wohl Ist Mir, O Freund Der Seelen."

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