From the Latin

The following articles have been translated from Latin original sources. Full details about the source and a preface to each translation is usually included with the translation. Just click a title to read more.

The Third Sermon: On the Preparation for Receiving the Lord’s Supper

by Johannes Brenz
translated by Andrew Hussman

In this third and final sermon on the Lord’s Supper, Johannes Brenz discusses how we should prepare ourselves to receive the Lord’s Supper. He explains how contrition, confession, and satisfaction, terms which have been misused by the Roman Catholic Church, can be properly used to help us prepare to receive the Lord’s Supper.

Second Sermon on the Passion

by Johannes Brenz
translated by Jacob Haag

In this set of three sermons from 1564, Johannes Brenz expounds upon a harmony of the passion history. Each of the translations was completed by different individuals who are all at various locations and stages of their training for the full-time Gospel ministry. The first sermon was translated by Aaron Voss, currently a senior at Martin Luther College, the second by Jacob Haag, currently studying in Leipzig, Germany at the seminary of our sister-synod, the Evangelisch-Lutherische FreiKirche (ELFK), and the third by Tim Rosenow, a first-year student at Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary in Mequon. Skills cultivated in the confessional languages prove valuable to pastoral students at every point of their education and remain a blessing into their ministry. May these words of Brenz be as valuable to their readers this Lenten season as they have been to their translators.

First Sermon on the Passion

by Johannes Brenz
translated by Aaron Voss

In this set of three sermons from 1564, Johannes Brenz expounds upon a harmony of the passion history. Each of the translations was completed by different individuals who are all at various locations and stages of their training for the full-time Gospel ministry. The first sermon was translated by Aaron Voss, currently a senior at Martin Luther College, the second by Jacob Haag, currently studying in Leipzig, Germany at the seminary of our sister-synod, the Evangelisch-Lutherische FreiKirche (ELFK), and the third by Tim Rosenow, a first-year student at Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary in Mequon. Skills cultivated in the confessional languages prove valuable to pastoral students at every point of their education and remain a blessing into their ministry. May these words of Brenz be as valuable to their readers this Lenten season as they have been to their translators.

The Second Sermon: On the Use of the Lord’s Supper

by Johannes Brenz
translated by Andrew Hussman

This is the second of three sermons on the Lord’s Supper by Johannes Brenz. After discussing in the first sermon what the Lord’s Supper is, he now proceeds to explain its use as a reassurance of the forgiveness of sins and provides several examples of how it can be applied.

The First Sermon: On the Substance of the Supper

by Johannes Brenz
translated by Andrew Hussman

This sermon comes from a book of sermons by Johannes Brenz that was published in 1556. It is the first of three that he preached on Maundy Thursday on the doctrine and applications of the Lord's Supper. In this first sermon Brenz expounds on the truth of Christ's real presence in the Lord's Supper and assures us of the confidence we can have in our omnipotent God who keeps his promises. The other two sermons, which will appear in later issues, will cover the blessings of the Lord's Supper and the proper preparation for receiving it.

On the Image of God in Man

by Matthias Hafenreffer
translated by Andrew Hussman

This section on the image of God in man is taken from Matthias Hafenreffer’s Loci Theologici of 1603. It is found in book three, which deals with the doctrine of man, the first state of man, his state before the fall, the third locus of that section. In it Hafenreffer shows from Scripture what the image of God is and what it is not, the value of this doctrine, and the errors to be avoided.

Christology as It Relates to the Lord's Supper

by Johannes Brenz
translated by Aaron Jensen

Caught amid a polemical flurry of Christology, Johannes Brenz had to set the record straight as to what he taught and believed concerning the communicated omnipresence of Christ. This work, originally written in 1561, set forth Brenz’s understanding of the issue and included as an appendix a selection of quotes from Martin Luther which show that the original reformer taught the same thing.

Disputation about the Creation of Man in the Image of God and the Horrible Destruction of that Image

by Jakob Andreae
translated by Aaron Jensen

In this disputation, Andreae points out that arguing about words for the sake of words is a waste of time that only brings about confusion and discord, yet the words are vitally important insofar as they preserve and defend God's revealed truth, and in that case are worth fighting for. Andreae shows that only through a correct understanding of the image of God and of original sin is our salvation and God's honor properly upheld.

On the Cross

by Jacob Heerbrand
translated by Andrew Hussman

In this section on the cross we not only learn the definition of the cross, but also what great comfort we believers receive in our crosses because they come from our heavenly Father who loves us.

Baptism and the Means of Salvation

by David Hollaz
translated by Nathaniel Biebert

Drawing from the well of God's Word, David Hollaz address the topic of baptism as a conferring means of salvation. He answers a variety of questions pertaining to the administering and receiving of baptism, infant baptism, and the spiritual state of children prior to baptism. Hollaz is in especially fine form in some of his responses to opponents of infant baptism.

Defense of Brenz

by Anonymous
translated by Philip Moldenhauer

Brenz’ Defense of the Things Which Schwenckfeld Noted in Brenz’ Exegesis of John Concerning the Sacrament. Part I.

The Highest Mystery of the Most Holy Trinity in the Old Testament

by David Hollaz
translated by Nathaniel Biebert

Some reputable theologians today regard the Trinity as an article of faith found only in the New Testament, or even as a teaching that first appeared after the Bible was written. David Hollaz demonstrates that even the Old Testament clearly testifies to the Trinity of divine persons. He proves this from the creation of the world, the leading of the Israelites out of Egypt, the promised sending and anointing of the Messiah, the solemn priestly blessing, and the trisagion of the angels.

On Baptism

by David Chytraeus
translated by Daniel Waldschmidt

Chytraeus gives a thorough explanation about the blessings that come to us through baptism. He illustrates that the blessings of baptism are for both this life and the life to come: Rebirth, forgiveness of sins, a sanctified Christian life and eternal glory in heaven are ours through Baptism.

The Restoration and Resurrection of the Dead (Part II)

by David Hollaz
translated by Kirk Lahmann

David Hollaz explored the Christian dogma regarding the restoration and resurrection of the dead. Using a thorough question-and-answer format, Hollaz answers questions ranging from basic to advanced. The article is published in two parts.

Doctrine of Predestination (Part III)

by Nikolaus Selnecker
translated by Souksamay Phetsanghane

Nikolaus Selnecker provides a thorough systematic treatment of the Christian doctrine of predestination. This difficult article of doctrine is well-covered in a thorough question-and-answer format in this article. It answers a great number of our questions about the nature of election. This translation is published in three parts.

The Restoration and Resurrection of the Dead (Part I)

by David Hollaz
translated by Kirk Lahmann

David Hollaz explored the Christian dogma regarding the restoration and resurrection of the dead. Using a thorough question-and-answer format, Hollaz answers questions ranging from basic to advanced. The translation is published in two parts.

Doctrine of Predestination (Part II)

by Nikolaus Selnecker
translated by Souksamay Phetsanghane

Nikolaus Selnecker provides a thorough systematic treatment of the Christian doctrine of predestination. This difficult article of doctrine is well-covered in a thorough question-and-answer format in this article. It answers a great number of our questions about the nature of election. This translation is published in three parts.

Doctrine of Predestination (Part I)

by Nikolaus Selnecker
translated by Souksamay Phetsanghane

Nikolaus Selnecker provides a thorough systematic treatment of the Christian doctrine of predestination. This difficult article of doctrine is well-covered in a thorough question-and-answer format in this article. It answers a great number of our questions about the nature of election. This translation is published in three parts.