Issue 16

Gold Nugget No. 2: Sermon on the 4th Sunday after Epiphany

by C.F.W. Walther
translated by Aaron Jensen

This sermon was written for the fourth Sunday after Epiphany, 1855. It is published here with a disclaimer. Walther interprets Jesus’ getting to a boat and sailing as signifying the Church of Christ travelling to a new place. We cannot approve of such allegorical hermeneutics. When Matthew said that Jesus got into a boat, he meant that Jesus got into a boat. Walther draws things from these passages which they do not contain. Nevertheless they are the pious thoughts of a faithful and gifted theologian and because they offer valuable insight into the history of the continually migrating Church they are a beneficial read. Of special interest may be some of his comments towards the end of the sermon, warning would happen even to his beloved St. Louis if they would not preserve the Gospel faithfully.

Gold Nugget No. 5: Mission Festival Sermon

by C.F.W. Walther
translated by Aaron Jensen

Walther preached this sermon at a mission festival held in Sheboygan, WI in June, 1864. In it he shows us the significance of the second petition of the Lord’s Prayer.

The First Sermon: On the Substance of the Supper

by Johannes Brenz
translated by Andrew Hussman

This sermon comes from a book of sermons by Johannes Brenz that was published in 1556. It is the first of three that he preached on Maundy Thursday on the doctrine and applications of the Lord's Supper. In this first sermon Brenz expounds on the truth of Christ's real presence in the Lord's Supper and assures us of the confidence we can have in our omnipotent God who keeps his promises. The other two sermons, which will appear in later issues, will cover the blessings of the Lord's Supper and the proper preparation for receiving it.

Chapter 22: Four Days of Preaching to the Heathens in the Land of Pudukottai

by Carl Manthey-Zorn
translated by Aaron Jensen

The following three pieces are the final three chapters from Carl Manthey-Zorn's memoirs of his time as a missionary in India entitled, "This and That from the Life of a Missionary to East India." For more information on Zorn, please see his biography, also published in this issue.

Chapter 23: Preaching to the Heathens in Kudumiamalei

by Carl Manthey-Zorn
translated by Aaron Jensen

This is one of three translations of the final three chapters from Carl Manthey-Zorn's memoirs of his time as a missionary in India entitled, "This and That from the Life of a Missionary to East India." For more information on Zorn, please see his biography, also published in this issue.

Chapter 24: All’s Well That Ends Well

by Carl Manthey-Zorn
translated by Aaron Jensen

This is one of three translations of the final three chapters from Carl Manthey-Zorn's memoirs of his time as a missionary in India entitled, "This and That from the Life of a Missionary to East India." For more information on Zorn, please see his biography, also published in this issue.

Philippians Hymn

by Johannes Olearius
translated by Aaron Jensen

This hymn, based upon Philippians 2:5-11, is set to the melody “O Gott, Du Frommer Gott” (CW 459).

Winter Hymn

by Joachim Neander
translated by Aaron Jensen

Joachim Neander (1650-1680) was a Reformed teacher and hymnist. He enjoyed wandering through the countryside near Duesseldorf, where he served as principal. Eventually in his honor this area was named Neanderthal, which means “Neander Valley,” and so indirectly he lent his name to the fossil found there in 1856. The most popular of his hymns is “Praise to the Lord, the Almighty” (CW234). This winter hymn, set to the melody “Gott Sei Dank Durch All Welt” (CW226), is also still sung today by the Amish to the tune of “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.”

Carl Manthey-Zorn

by Andrew Hussman

Carl Manthey-Zorn was born March 18, 1846 in Sterup, Germany, not far from the border of Denmark. His father, Hans Zorn, was a Lutheran pastor and his mother, Lina Manthey, was from a Danish noble family (when Carl was born his Manthey grandfather wanted him to have his surname, since he himself had no sons). Carl received a good German education as a child while he lived in Hochspeyer and Odernheim, in western Germany. Despite his confirmation and upbringing in a pastor’s household, religion did not have a big impact on him at this time in his life.